Posted in Films from 30’s to 60’s, U.S. Film

THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (1960)

A bandit terrorizes a small Mexican farming village each year. Several of the village elders send three of the farmers into the United States to search for gunmen to defend them. They end up with 7, each of whom comes for a different reason. They must prepare the town to repulse an army of 40 bandits who will arrive wanting food. An Americanization of the film, Les sept samouraïs. When filming began in Mexico, problems arose with the local censors, who demanded changes to the ways that the Mexican villagers would be portrayed. Walter Newman, who had written the screenplay, was asked to travel to the location to make the necessary script revisions, but refused. The changes written in by William Roberts were deemed significant enough to merit him a co-writing credit. Newman refused to share the credit, though, and had his name removed from the film entirely. Yul Brynner was married on the set; the celebration used many of the same props as the fiesta scene. James Coburn (Britt) and Robert Vaughn (Lee) have only 11 and 16 lines in the entire film respectively. Although they were close friends for almost 50 years, this is their only film together. Pay close attention to Eli Wallach whenever he handles his gun. Whenever he puts the gun back into his holster, he always looks down at it. That was because Wallach wasn’t used to drawing the weapon and didn’t want to look foolish by missing the holster while putting his gun back, as Wallach would admit in the DVD Documentary.

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I first stated this site with 2 friends but I am the only one now taking care of it. I love movies sometimes that is all I talk about. I love TCM the best station ever. I am studying to be an Infographics/special effect for movies. I will put the best films on my website no exception. It is like I am evolving with it, I am constantly redoing stuff on it. So have fun with it and thank you for visiting.

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